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100 years, decade by decade - 1970-1979

Monday, 30.11.2009 / 4:12 AM / History
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100 years, decade by decade - 1970-1979
Le 4 décembre 2009, date du centenaire des Canadiens de Montréal, approche à grands pas. Nous vous présentons un rapide survol des dix décennies de la riche histoire du Tricolore. Visitez-nous quotidiennement jusqu’au centième anniversaire des Canadiens et revivez les plus grands moments de l’équipe de hockey la plus primée de la Ligue nationale. Aujourd’hui, la décennie 1970-1979.

Stanley Cup No. 17
On May 18, 1971, the Canadiens met the Blackhawks at Chicago Stadium in the seventh and deciding game of the Stanley Cup Finals. More.

The Bowman Effect
On June 9, 1971, Canadiens General Manager Sam Pollock hand picks Scotty Bowman as the team’s new Head Coach. More.

Pollock Selects Lafleur
On June 10, 1971, at the Queen Elizabeth Hotel in Montreal, Canadiens General Manager Sam Pollock shows his knack for mining young talent by adding two future Hall of Famers to his club in a single day. More.

No. 4 Retired Forever
On October 9, 1971, just months after witnessing the retirement of their longtime captain, the Canadiens bestow the ultimate honor on Jean Béliveau by raising his famed No. 4 jersey to the Forum rafters. More.

Stanley Cup No. 18
On May 10, 1973, with the Montreal set to meet the Chicago Blackhawks in the sixth game of that spring’s Stanley Cup Finals, the Canadiens were a win away from sipping from the Cup for the second time in three years. More.

Henri pockets no. 1000
On December 20, 1973, Henri Richard took advantage of a Canadiens road game in Buffalo to join a very select club. More.

Road Warriors
On March 12th, 1975, the Canadiens took their status as that season’s NHL road warriors into Toronto to meet the Maple Leafs. More.

Lapointe Sets Blue Line Record
Playing in Washington against the Capitals on April 5, 1975, Guy Lapointe closed out what can only be described as a dream season. More.

Jarvis the Iron Man
Taking his first strides on NHL ice, rookie Doug Jarvis suited up against the Los Angeles Kings to open the 1975-76 schedule, picking up a pair of assists in the Canadiens’ 9-0 triumph on October 8, 1975. More.

No. 16 Retired Forever
On December 10, 1975, the Canadiens honor the greatest individual champion in NHL history by retiring Henri Richard’s No. 16. More.

The Cold War on Ice
On December 31, 1975, the Montreal Canadiens hosted the Soviet Red Army team in one of the greatest games of all time. More.

Stanley Cup No. 19
On May 16, 1976, a wind of change blew through the Philadelphia Spectrum, sweeping out roughhousing and replacing it with talent as the determining factor for NHL supremacy. More.

The Greatest Team Ever
On April 3, 1977, the Canadiens met the Capitals in Washington, playing the last game of a regular season that most players can only dream of, and leaving the NHL record book in dire need of revision. More.

Stanley Cup No. 20
On May 14, 1977, holding a 3-0 edge over the Boston Bruins in the Stanley Cup Finals, the Canadiens were poised to cap off a season already brimming with success in the best possible way. More.

Stanley Cup No. 21
On May 25, 1978 the Canadiens traveled to Boston to meet the Bruins in the sixth game of the Stanley Cup Finals. More.

Dryden's Lucky Seven
On April 4, 1979, Ken Dryden and the Canadiens faced off against the Detroit Red Wings at the Forum, with the netminder needing only one more victory to put another 30-win campaign into the books. More.

Too Many Men
Facing elimination for the first time in four years, the Montreal Canadiens met the Boston Bruins in the seventh and deciding game of the semifinals on May 10, 1979. More.

Stanley Cup No. 22
On May 21, 1979, the Canadiens were a victory away from capturing their first Stanley Cup in front of hometown fans since the spring of 1968. More.

Life Begins at 50
Guy Lafleur arrived at Detroit’s Joe Louis Arena on April 2, 1980 with 48 goals to his credit since opening night. In each of the five preceding seasons, the Canadiens’ electrifying right-winger had found a way to break the 50-goal barrier. More.